888.326.9244

DuraLabel's Weekly Safety News

Blog Author Steve Hudgik

Weekly safety news. Stay in touch with what is happening at OSHA as well as other workplace safety news. Includes a report on the significant OSHA citations announced the previous week. Plus we scan national and local (and world) publications for workplace safety news. This is your source for the latest safety news.


Monday, June 02, 2014

Safety News Briefs

A regular news feature summarizing workplace safety related news.

We scan newspapers, magazines and the internet for safety news that isn't being reported elsewhere. The following are links to safety-related news and articles that came out during the past week. If you have safety news, or safety tips, send them to: duralabelpro@gmail.com.


Annual OSHA Campaign to Prevent Heat-Related Illnesses

OSHA has announced the launch of its annual Campaign to Prevent Heat Illness in Outdoor Workers. For the fourth consecutive year, OSHA's campaign aims to raise awareness and educate workers and employers about the dangers of working in hot weather and provide resources and guidance to address these hazards. Workers at particular risk are those in outdoor industries, such as agriculture, construction, landscaping and transportation.

"Heat-related illnesses can be fatal, and employers are responsible for keeping workers safe," said U.S. Secretary of Labor Thomas E. Perez. "Employers can take a few easy steps to save lives, including scheduling frequent water breaks, providing shade and allowing ample time to rest."

WATER. REST. SHADE. The work can't get done without them.

Thousands of employees become sick each year and many die from working in the heat. In 2012, there were 31 heat-related worker deaths and 4,120 heat-related worker illnesses. Labor-intensive activities in hot weather can raise body temperatures beyond the level that normally can be cooled by sweating. Heat illness initially may manifest as heat rash or heat cramps, but can quickly escalate to heat exhaustion and then heat stroke if simple preventative measures are not followed. Heat illness disproportionately affects those who have not built up a tolerance to heat (acclimatization), and it is especially dangerous for new and temporary workers.

"Acclimatization is a physical change that the body undergoes to build tolerance to heat, and it is a critical part of preventing heat illnesses and fatalities," said Dr. David Michaels, assistant secretary of labor for occupational safety and health. "Over the past three years, lack of acclimatization was the cause in 74 percent of heat-related citations issued. Employers have a responsibility to provide workplaces that are safe from recognized hazards, including outdoor heat."

Last year, OSHA issued 11 heat-related citations. In some of these cases, the employer and staffing agency were cited because they involved temporary workers.

In preparation for the summer season, OSHA has developed heat illness educational materials in English and Spanish, as well as a curriculum to be used for workplace training, also available in both English and Spanish. Additionally, a Web page provides information and resources on heat illness - including how to prevent it and what to do in case of an emergency - for workers and employers. The page is available at: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/index.html.

OSHA also has released a free application for mobile devices that enables workers and supervisors to monitor the heat index at their work sites. The app displays a risk level for workers based on the heat index, as well as reminders about protective measures that should be taken at that risk level. Since its 2011 launch, more than 130,000 users have downloaded the app. Available for Android-based platforms and the iPhone, the app can be downloaded in English and Spanish by visiting: http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/heatillness/heat_index/heat_app.html.

In developing its inaugural national campaign in 2011, federal OSHA worked closely with the California Occupational Safety and Health Administration and adapted materials from that state's successful campaign. Additionally, OSHA is partnering with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to incorporate worker safety precautions when heat alerts are issued across the nation. NOAA also will include pertinent worker safety information on its heat watch Web page at http://www.noaawatch.gov/themes/heat.php.


Related past posts:
Safety News Briefs - Old School Inspections
Safety News Briefs - OSHA Jail
Arizona vs. OSHA - The Story Continues

Labels:

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



OSHA Significant Citations

OSHA defines a significant citation as one with more than $100,000 in proposed fines. An OSHA citation is a claim by OSHA that there has been a safety violation. It does not mean a violation has taken place, nor that the violation is as severe as claimed. The company has 15 days to contest OSHA claims. The following are the citations OSHA announced last week that have total fines of $100,000 or more.

OSHA cites Chicago Engineering Company For Trenching Hazards  ($147,000)
Tire Retreader Fined For Failing To Correct Hazards ($160,280)


For the second time this year OSHA has cited Pan-Oceanic Engineering Co. Inc. for failing to protect workers from trenching hazards at a job site at East 93rd Street and South Woodlawn Avenue in Chicago. OSHA cited the company for willful violations for again failing to protect workers from trench cave-ins while installing water and sewer lines in November 2013. Proposed penalties total $147,000..

Kathy Webb, OSHA's area director in Calumet City, said, "Since 2003, this company has been cited multiple times for violations of trenching standards, which result in numerous fatalities and injuries every year."

OSHA opened the inspection under the National Emphasis Program for trenching and excavation, which was implemented in the 1980s. The company was placed in the Severe Violator Enforcement Program in January 2014 when it was issued four violations for failing to adhere to trenching standards. The company has contested those violations, which carried penalties of $105,600.

For the most recent violations, OSHA was issued two willful citations for failing to ensure workers were protected from cave-in hazards while working in a trench that exceeded 5 feet in depth and failing to support the street pavement above the trench from collapsing on the workers. OSHA standards mandate that all excavations 5 feet or deeper be protected against collapse. Detailed information on trenching and excavation hazards is available.

A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.

One serious violation was issued after a competent person found evidence of potential cave-in hazards and failed to remove employees from the hazardous conditions..

A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known. .

OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law and focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations. Under the program, OSHA may inspect any of the employer's facilities or job sites..

To view the citations, visit:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/PanOceanicEngineeringcompany_950363_0521_14.pdf.



American Made Tires, an Elmira Heights, tire retreader, failed to correct 12 hazards cited during a 2013 inspection by OSHA. Because of that inaction, and the discovery of new and recurring hazards during a follow-up OSHA inspection, the company faces an additional $160,280 in proposed fines.

OSHA's Syracuse Area Office initially cited the company for 16 serious violations of workplace safety standards in July 2013, following an inspection conducted between March and July 2013. American Made Tires agreed to correct the cited hazards and pay the required fine of $20,100. When the company failed to submit proof that it had corrected the hazards, OSHA opened a follow-up inspection in November 2013.

The new inspection found ongoing hazards, including improperly constructed flammable adhesive spray booths located within 20 feet of spark-producing equipment; failure to implement lockout/tagout procedures to protect workers who service or maintain machines; lack of machine guarding for a tire buffer machine; and lack of a communications program and training for employees working with hazardous chemicals.

Because of these uncorrected hazards, OSHA issued American Made Tire 12 failure-to-abate notices, carrying $144,000 in fines. A failure-to-abate notice applies to a condition, hazard or practice for which the employer was originally cited, and upon reinspection, was found uncorrected.

Three repeat violations were cited for hazards similar to those cited in the earlier inspection. These included use of hazardous electrical equipment, accumulation of combustible dust and use of a spark-producing grinder in a flammable area. These violations carry $14,080 in fines.

Finally, one serious citation, with a $2,200 fine, was issued for use of a portable electric lamp in a spraying area during operations
. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

The failure-to-abate notices and citations can be viewed at:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/American_Made_Tire_896494_May_21_14.pdf
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/American_Made_Tires_950323_May_21_14.pdf.


Related Past Posts:
Significant Citations Part I - Over $1,075,000 In Fines
Significant Citations - OSHA Fines Cooper Power $166,000
Four Significant Citations Announced Last Week

Labels: , ,

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



Monday, May 26, 2014

This Week's Safety News


May 26, 2014
Use these links to go directly to each section of this week's safety news:

Safety News Briefs

  • Time May Not Reduce Brain Effects of Solvent Exposure
  • Republic Steel's Response To OSHA Citations

OSHA Significant Citations Announced Last Week

  • Fortune Painting Co. Cited For Repeated Lead Exposure ($159,390)
  • Amputation & Other Hazards at Kobelco Stewart Bolling ($139,000)
  • OSHA fines All-Feed Processing and Packaging For Combustible Dust ($254,000)
  • Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co. After Forklift Fatality ($168,700)

Safety Training - Improve Reliability, Improve Safety

  • Ten Nuggets to Make Reliability a Reality at Your Plant

World Safety News

  • U.K. - Occupational Health: Vital for Economic Growth
  • Canada - National Student Workplace Safety Video Contest Winners

Labels:

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



Safety News Briefs - Time May Not Reduce Brain Effects of Solvent Exposure

A regular news feature summarizing workplace safety related news.

We scan newspapers, magazines and the internet for safety news that isn't being reported elsewhere. The following are links to safety-related news and articles that came out during the past week. If you have safety news, or safety tips, send them to: duralabelpro@gmail.com.


Time May Not Reduce Brain Effects of Solvent Exposure

Reuters Health is reporting on a new study that has found that the effects of exposure to workplace solvents, paints, adhesives and glues continue for decades after the exposure stopped. Workers exposed to these substances experience memory and thinking problems that may not show up for decades. Other studies have reported that solvents can have these effects even at currently acceptable exposure limits.

The article states:

"Workers exposed to solvents on the job may experience memory and thinking problems decades later, according to a new study. Exposure to paints, degreasers, adhesives and glues is common in some occupations, and has been linked to problems such as memory loss, reduced cognitive processing speed and difficulty staying focused."

Read the article here.


Republic Steel's Response To OSHA Citations

Crain's Cleveland Business tells the story behind Republic Steel's $2.4 million settlement with OSHA last April.  The article states:

"The citations were 'very significant,' said Jim Frederick, assistant director of health, safety and environment at the United Steelworkers. But Republic Steel reached out to the union from the start of the inspections, and the two worked together to create a plan that looks at health and safety in a holistic way across the company, he said."

 Read the story here.


Related past posts:
Safety News Briefs - Old School Inspections
Safety News Briefs - OSHA Jail
Arizona vs. OSHA - The Story Continues

Labels:

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



OSHA Significant Citations

OSHA defines a significant citation as one with more than $100,000 in proposed fines. An OSHA citation is a claim by OSHA that there has been a safety violation. It does not mean a violation has taken place, nor that the violation is as severe as claimed. The company has 15 days to contest OSHA claims. The following are the citations OSHA announced last week that have total fines of $100,000 or more.

Fortune Painting Co. Cited For Repeated Lead Exposure ($159,390)
Amputation & Other Hazards at Kobelco Stewart Bolling ($139,000)
OSHA fines All-Feed Processing and Packaging For Combustible Dust ($254,000)
Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co. After Forklift Fatality ($168,700)


Fortune Painting Co. Inc. has been cited for 25 violations by OSHA, including willful and repeat violations for exposing workers to dangerous levels of lead from lead-based paint. OSHA cited the company for failing to protect workers from serious fall hazards while restoring a home in Wilmette. The Lincolnwood-based company has an extensive history of OSHA violations and faces proposed penalties of $159,390 after the most recent investigation. Lead exposure can cause long-term damage to the central nervous, urinary, blood and reproductive systems.

OSHA initiated an inspection of the company in November 2013 under the National Emphasis Program for Lead and Local Emphasis Program for Fall Hazards.

"Lead is one of the most common health hazards found in industry and is a leading cause of workplace illness. Lead particles are easily transported from work sites on clothing and other materials, so taking precautions to prevent exposure is vitally important to the health of workers and their families," said Angie Loftus, OSHA's area director for Chicago North in Des Plaines. "Fortune Painting has a history of failing to comply with OSHA standards. Repeat violators demonstrate a lack of concern for the safety and health of their workers."

Fortune Painting failed to determine employee exposure to lead before directing workers to remove paint with sanders and scrapers from the Wilmette home, resulting in a willful OSHA violation. A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirement, or with plain indifference to employee safety and health.

The company was issued seven repeat citations. Repeat violations involved OSHA's respiratory protection standards, such as failing to ensure workers had properly fitted respirators to protect them from lead overexposure and to train them in respiratory use and procedures. Other repeat violations include dry sweeping debris contaminated with lead-based paint, failing to provide dedicated work shoes or disposable coverlets and lack of a clean changing area to prevent the spread of lead contamination.

The company was also cited a repeat violation for failing to protect workers from fall hazards. Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Last year, nearly 300 workers were fatally injured in construction-related falls nationwide.

A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Fortune Painting was previously cited for these hazards at job sites in 2008 and 2012. Since 2008, the company has been inspected by OSHA 10 times, resulting in multiple violations.

Fortune Painting was cited for 14 serious violations involving lack of respiratory protection; personal protective equipment, such as safety glasses and clothing; training and administrative controls; and housekeeping practices. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Three additional violations involved failing to implement a lead exposure compliance program, improper use of electrical equipment and failing to provide medical recommendations for each employee's ability to use a respirator.

To view the citations see:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Fortune_Painting_948881_Safety.pdf
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Fortune_Painting_948845_Health.pdf

Fortune Painting has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


Kobelco Stewart Bolling Inc., which manufactures industrial machinery, has been cited for 13 safety and health violations by OSHA. Proposed penalties at the company's Hudson facility total $139,000. OSHA's investigation was initiated following a worker complaint, and the investigation found repeat violations of machine guarding standards, which protect workers from lacerations, caught-in and amputation hazards.

"Failing to protect workers from dangerous machinery is among the most frequently cited OSHA violations and injuries involving machinery and equipment often result in death or permanent disability," said Howard Eberts, OSHA's area director in Cleveland.

OSHA QuickCard: Protect Yourself. Amputations. Amputations are widespread and involve a variety of activities and equipment. Each year, thousands of workers lose fingers, hands, feet, and other body parts-mostly through compression, crushing, or by getting them caught between or struck by objects. Most amputations involve fingertips.

Three repeat violations were cited for:
  • inadequate lockout/tagout procedures to protect workers who service or maintain machines from moving machinery parts
  • exposing workers to unguarded equipment
  • not labeling chemical containers.
A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. The company was cited for similar violations in 2011.

Six serious violations involved:
  • failing to review lockout/tagout devices annually
  • storing flammable liquids in an exit path
  • lack of fire extinguisher training
  • not identifying and providing the correct chemical resistant gloves to be worn
  • failing to train workers on personal protective equipment.
An OSHA violation is serious if death or serious physical harm can result from a hazard an employer knew or should have known exists.

Kobelco Stewart Bolling was also cited for four other-than-serious violations involving failing to certify and date the workplace hazard assessment, guard machinery, inspect cranes daily and maintain a chemical inventory list.

To view the current citations see:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/KobelcoStewartBolling_948383_0513_14.pdf


OSHA has again cited All-Feed Processing and Packaging Inc. for willful and repeat violations for exposing workers to combustible and respiratory dust hazards. In addition to creating an explosion hazard, the plant's high concentration of airborne dust could cause workplace-induced asthma and other illnesses. The company was cited for willful electrical and equipment violations for failing to provide approved equipment for working near combustible dust. OSHA initiated an inspection in November 2013 after a complaint and found one repeat and five willful violations. OSHA has proposed penalties of $254,000 for the pet food manufacturer, which remains in OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

Because of the most recent inspection, OSHA has cited the company for five willful violations involving exposing workers to combustible pea flour dust by failing to install a dust collection system with explosion protection. Any combustible material can burn rapidly when in a finely divided form. If such a dust is suspended in the air in the right concentration, under certain conditions, it can become explosive. OSHA also found that electrical equipment and forklifts used by the company were not approved for use in combustible-dust atmospheres. Arcs and sparks from forklifts had the potential to ignite the dust, causing an explosion hazard.

The force from such an explosion can cause employee deaths, injuries and building destruction. For example, three workers were killed in a 2010 titanium dust explosion in West Virginia, and 14 workers were killed in a 2008 sugar dust explosion in Georgia. The U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board identified 281 combustible dust incidents between 1980 and 2005 that led to the deaths of 119 workers, 718 injuries and extensive damage to numerous industrial facilities.

All-Feed was cited for allowing worker exposure to airborne concentrations of dust by failing to implement engineering controls and mandating respiratory protection use to prevent dust particle inhalation and struck by hazards, all willful violations.

A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.

One repeat violation was cited for failing to establish an audiometric testing program for all workers whose noise exposure exceeded an eight-hour time weighted average of 85 decibels. OSHA issues repeat violations when a company has previously been cited for the same or a similar violation within the last five years. OSHA cited All-Feed for 23 safety and health violations in November 2011, including willful violations of OSHA's air contaminant, respiratory protection and hearing conservation standards.

To view the citations, visit:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/All-FeedProcessingandPackaging_948509_0509_14.pdf
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/All-FeedProcessingandPackaging_948541_0509_14.pdf

OSHA has inspected All-Feed 14 times since 2000, resulting in more than 70 violations.

In early 2012, the U.S. District Court for the Central District of Illinois, Peoria Division, found Galva-based All-Feed in civil contempt of court for failing to allow OSHA to inspect its facility between May 4-July 5, 2011, to monitor employee's eight-hour time-weighted average exposure to airborne dust. After gaining entry to conduct the monitoring, workers were found to be exposed to dust particles in excess of the time-weighted allowance per shift


Following the death of a worker who was hit by a forklift, OSHA has cited Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co. with nine-including two willful and seven serious-safety violations. The incident occurred Nov. 19, 2013, at the Detroit marine terminal when the worker was struck by a 62,000-pound-capacity forklift carrying a 40,000-pound steel coil. The company has been placed in OSHA's Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

"Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co. has a responsibility to train its workers in the safe operation of dangerous equipment, and a worker tragically lost his life because this company failed to live up to that responsibility," said Larry Johnson, OSHA's area director in Lansing.

A willful citation was issued for modifying a forklift without obtaining manufacturer approval. A second willful citation was issued for failing to establish vehicle routes, traffic rules and to post signs indicating pedestrian traffic where employees work. A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirement, or with plain indifference to employee safety and health.

Seven serious safety violations were cited. Five of those involve forklift safety. The citations included failing to:
  • train employees on operating instructions, warnings and precautions listed in the operator's manual;
  • maintain vehicles in safe working order;
  • direct employees to sound the horn when visibility was obstructed;
  • monthly crane inspections;
  • test cargo gear for load capacity.
An OSHA violation is serious if death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard an employer knew or should have known exists.

OSHA has proposed penalties of $168,700. To view the current citations, visit:
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/NTandD_citation_949121.pdf

Nicholson Terminal & Dock Co. employs about 75 workers and has 15 business days from receipt of its citations and penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director, or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.

Being struck-by vehicles and other objects is a leading cause of workplace deaths. Approximately 75 percent of struck-by fatalities involve heavy equipment. Causes of struck-by accidents typically involve reverse vehicle movement into a pedestrian outside the driver's field of vision, or vehicles falling off ramps, inclines or unstable ground. Accident prevention strategies include ensuring back-up alarms are functional, check the periphery of vehicle before operating, stay alert, obey all traffic rules and signs, minimize distractions, inspect and maintain vehicles, use safety belts and turn on headlights.


Related Past Posts:
Significant Citations Part I - Over $1,075,000 In Fines
Significant Citations - OSHA Fines Cooper Power $166,000
Four Significant Citations Announced Last Week

Labels: , , ,

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



Safety Training - Improve Reliability, Improve Safety

Information and news about safety training, plus links to articles providing "how to" information on topics that can help improve workplace safety.

This section summarizes and links to magazine articles with useful information about safety. If you spot a particularly good article, please let us know so we can share it with everyone. My email address is: duralabelpro@gmail.com.


Ten Nuggets to Make Reliability a Reality at Your Plant

Mike Bacidore returns from a conference with nuggets of wisdom for improving reliability... and if you improve reliability you improve safety. The majority of articles I read are a rehash of information I've read before. In this article Mike brings a fresh perspective and ten truly valuable tips for improving reliability by using foundational principles.

Mike is actually reporting on a presentations by Allied Reliability Group Principal Doug Plucknette. He writes:

Excuses are one of the most common hurdles to implementing a reliability culture in a plant. They’re the list of reasons why reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) won’t work. Plucknette reminded us of a few:
  • My boss doesn't support this.
  • We're so far behind, what's the point?
  • The operations group doesn't get it.
  • We don't have the tools or training to start.
Plucknette recommended starting with some basic blocking and tackling:
  • Do what you say you're going to do.
  • Bring data to support the need for change.
  • Rally and reinforce supporters.
  • Publish all successes to build the business case.
  • There's so much you can do without having to say, "I need more money."

But these are not the ten nuggets of wisdom you'll get from this article. Use this link to read about how to improve reliability in your plant.


Labels:

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (0 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



World Safety News - Occupational Health: Vital for Economic Growth

Workplace Safety News Highlights From Around The World


We scan newspapers and magazines around the world for safety news that isn't reported elsewhere.

The following are links to workplace safety-related news and articles that we noticed this past week. If you have international safety news, safety tips, or suggestions send them to: duralabelpro@gmail.com.


U.K. - Occupational Health: Vital for Economic Growth

This article, in the Safety And Health Practitioner (the official publication of IOSH in the U.K.) ponts out the importants of workplace health and safety.

 "UK businesses will have to improve occupational health performance in order to maintain economic growth, according to a report by the Council for Work and Health."

"The council, which represents over 20 leading health organisations, says that better occupational health will be vital to ensure the UK's economic stability over the next 20 years, in addition to improving the healthcare of the working population."


Read the article here.


Canada - National Student Workplace Safety Video Contest Winners

The Student Workplace Safety Video Contest challenges high school aged youth to create workplace safety videos promoting safety among their peers. Each province and territory conducts its own It's Your Job! contest with the winners moving on to a national competition. Here are the top winners for 2014:

Just Ask - Fan Favourite Winner



Links to other winning videos:

On Call - First Place National Winner
Flower - Second Place National Winner 


Related past posts:
World Safety News - Manitoba Proposes Increasing Fines For Workers Comp Fraud
World Safety News - Suing Workers Comp In Canada
World Safety News - Sweet Factory Fined

Labels:

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (1 Comments)
| Add Your Comments | links



To receive a once a week
email with safety news
Enter Your Email Address Here:



Example Email
You can unsubscribe at any time
Powered by FeedBlitz
Safe Workplace Blog Home

To receive a once a week
email with safety news
Enter Your Email Address Here:



Example Email
You can unsubscribe at any time
Powered by FeedBlitz

Archives