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DuraLabel's Weekly Safety News

Blog Author Angelique Sanders

Weekly safety news. Stay in touch with regulations from OSHA, NFPA, and other safety codes. Find out about other companies' best and worst practices. We scour the internet to provide you with helpful training resources and the latest safety information.


Monday, May 18, 2015

Workplace Safety: Free Resources, Tips, and Training Vids

Workplace safety may not make the top brass' list of priorities when they discuss ways to improve the bottom line. But given the financial impact that an effective workplace safety strategy can have on cost and productivity, perhaps it should be. Here are 5 areas where you can improve workplace safety. It includes a collection of videos, infographics and white papers with tips on ergonomics, safety culture, safe lifting, slips/trips/falls, and heat stress. 

Safety Training Videos

Here are some helpful (and free!) safety training videos on a variety of topics:

US Department of Labor and OSHA -- a collection of 62 safety-related videos

Washington State Department of Labor and Industries videos focusing on training and hazard prevention

OSHA safety videos on every topic imaginable

DuPont features "Safety Training Observation Program" (STOP) which includes videos and other resources for setting up or improving your workplace safety program

This set of safety videos--on topics such as heat stress, hearing and eye protection, and ladder safety--includes several in Spanish.

Safety Inspection via Smart Phone?


Technology has revolutionized the way we communicate, interact with others and even how we work. Smart phones are so common in the workplace that if an app can save time, most companies are willing to put it to the test. Find out how you can conduct a safety audit via tablet or smart phone. Here are some audit templates you can use from your device.

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Monday, May 11, 2015

7 Things You Need to Remember About Workplace Safety

What’s more challenging than implementing good health and safety practices? Changing poor practices after you’ve already started. Habits are hard to break, even if you know they're bad.  

The piece also includes several infographics and survey data on key barriers to implementing safer practices.  >> 7 things you can do

Online Safety Courses, including Certification

Oregon OSHA offers some great free online courses with certification. Choose from topics like fall protection, job hazard analysis, HazCom, safety leadership, OSHA 300 recordkeeping, ladder safety, and more. Pick a course, send a link to employees, set a deadline for completion, easy!  >> Free training courses

Need Spanish resources? Forms, courses, audio training modules, and a glossary of safety terms in Spanish to English or English to Spanish are all available here.

They also have great training materials on lockout-tagout, including printable course material, workbook, instructor guide, training videos, even online courses with certification. Go to this page and scroll down to Education and Training at right.

Do you speak OSHA?

How well do you know OSHA terminology? Put yourself to the test.  >> Take the quiz

Need a quick visual reference to OSHA and ANSI-compliant sign making? Hang this poster wherever signs and labels are being made.  >> Get the poster

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Monday, May 04, 2015

Worker Killed in Sterilization Oven

Sometimes an OSHA fine is the least of your worries.

Criminal charges are being brought up against Bumble Bee Foods and its former safety manager for workplace safety violations that resulted in the macabre and disturbing death of an employee. Jose Melena was working inside a giant tuna can sterilization oven and somehow became trapped inside. He was found after the oven was opened to remove the tuna.

Various safety standards were violated, to cause this incident. A preventative safety plan had not been implemented, a lockout-tagout procedure was not in place to prevent turning on the oven when someone was in it, and rules for confined spaces were broken.  >> Find out what happened

Overpass Falls, Kills 3

When you're driving, you're alert to hazards around you and in front of you. But above you?

Part of an overpass' concrete wall broke loose during a construction project and hit a truck passing beneath the bridge, killing three.  >> Read the full story


Free Workplace Safety Posters

OSHA has released a new job safety and health poster, which employers are required to display.

This might be an ideal time to assess what other safety messages could be helpful in your workplace. Here are some posters which could act as training resources or help workers avoid hazards.

Other OSHA posters

State of New York safety posters

Additional categories

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Monday, April 20, 2015

HazCom, HazCom, HazCom

With the June 1st deadline breathing down your neck and the popularity of our HazCom coverage last week, we're diving in...

Manufacturers Showing ‘Good Faith’ on GHS May Avoid Citations, OSHA says

Some manufacturers of chemical mixtures will not be cited for failing to immediately comply with new Safety Data Sheet and chemical labeling requirements if they exercise “good faith,” a Feb. 9 OSHA enforcement memorandum states.

Manufacturers and importers face a June 1 deadline for using SDSs and labels that are compliant with OSHA’s updated Hazard Communication Standard. But because the classification of chemical mixtures depends on SDSs and labels from raw-material providers, some manufacturers or importers may not have the most up-to-date or accurate information.  >> Find out if this could apply to you

History's Worst Chemical Plant Accidents

Due to the risk associated with them, there are few industrial accidents that cause as much damage as an accident at a chemical plant. Throughout history, we have seen these types of disasters result in catastrophic damage, including fatalities, severe injuries, and unimaginable property damage.  >> Worst U.S. chemical plant accidents


HazCom - FAQs (and the answers)

If you're involved with chemical labeling, let's face it: you have questions. How do you comply with the new rules, what is allowed and what isn't? Here are answers to some frequently asked chemical safety questions. 

A collection of HazCom resources, including a timeline infographic

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Monday, April 13, 2015

HazCom webinar, safety blind spots, and smoke-free workplaces

HazCom: Are you Ready?

Just in time for the final deadline! Occupational Health & Safety is hosting a free GHS & HazCom webinar on April 23rd. Expert Tom Jacques will guide you through GHS and HazCom confusion, providing a ‘last call’ alert to meet the June 1st deadline and assure your facility is ready.

This live one-hour event will discuss the deadline and implementation problems many workplace safety and health professionals are encountering. Get your questions answered and make sure you’re meeting all the new requirements.


About presenter Tom Jacques: Jacques is a compliance expert and GHS consultant. He has written a book about chemical agents and even invented a portable decontamination system in use by many hospitals as well as the FBI.


Can't attend the webinar, or would like a training resource? Graphic Products offers a free guide to HazCom 2012 best practices. Get it here.

The old, confusing Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), with a different format from every chemical supplier, is gone. Now you'll see information in a consistent, 16-section Safety Data Sheet (SDS). Labels are simpler, too; every chemical label will have the same six parts, from Product Identifiers to Supplier Information, and each hazard will be identified with a bold, recognizable symbol in a red diamond. The free guide walks you through the new requirements.

Safety Blind Spots in the Most Dangerous Industries

Safety industry professionals have made great strides in reducing the number of workplace injuries and fatalities in the U.S. In fact, the number of deaths at work has steadily declined over the last 30 years. That said, workplace accidents still took the lives of 4,405 workers in 2013. This number is still far too high, given what we know today about employee safety, chiefly because many of these incidents could have been prevented. Therefore, breaking down the most common types of accidents by industry will reveal the key safety blind spots for each.  >> Read more


NIOSH Advises Enforcing a Smoke-Free Workplace

Since 1965 publication of the first Surgeon General’s Report on the health consequences of smoking, cigarette smoking in the United States has declined by more than 50 percent among all U.S. adults, to about 18 percent in 2013. In some industries more than others (such as construction, mining, and food services), smoking is still pretty prevalent.

The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) recommends that workplaces should have smoke-free policies for all indoor areas, all areas immediately outside the building entrances and air intakes, and all work vehicles. >> Find out more




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Monday, April 06, 2015

Farmhand Survives 40k Volts, Loading Dock Safety, more

In the summer of 1999 Weber went to work like his father before him building grain bins on the Saskatchewan prairies. The summer job was a means to an end – a spot in the junior hockey league in Alberta that fall.

On July 29, 1999 – his third day on the job – those bins and 40,000 volts of electricity nearly cost him his life.

Just before transporting the bin, the crew discussed how the power line had the potential to kill somebody. That someone was Weber. The crane operator failed to lower the boom and backed into the power line. Weber became the ground point for the electricity.  >> Read his story


Three Strategies to make your Loading Dock Safer

When you mix speed, forklifts and foot traffic with trailers and other heavy equipment, what do you get? You get the setting for one in four industrial accidents each year.

Considering the high cost of accidents and injuries, it’s no surprise that manufacturing leaders are reexamining and rethinking the way they approach safety management in their operations – and the loading dock is no exception.  >> Here's how to make yours safer


6 Steps of a Job Hazard Analysis: Infographic

Assessing your workplace and identifying employee health and safety hazards is required by OSHA. But a good job hazard analysis (JHA) has benefits beyond ensuring compliance, like lower risk of work-related deaths, illnesses, and injuries, reducing absenteeism, and increasing productivity.  >> View infographic

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Monday, March 30, 2015

OSHA Injury Log, Preventing Post-Termination Claims, more

Five tips for Maintaining an OSHA Injury and Illness Log

OSHA standard 1904.7 specifies rules for the injury and illness records (the OSHA log) that must be maintained. But what needs to be logged? What happens if you don't keep a log?  >> What you need to know

Using Chinese Suppliers?

A big complaint about items manufactured in China is that quality can be inconsistent. Products can even be unsafe at times, like the recent accusations that Lumber Liquidators sold Chinese-imported laminate containing high levels of formaldehyde.

But some companies known for consistent quality and product safety--like Apple and Target--use Chinese suppliers. How do they ensure quality? Here are six ways.

How to Prevent Post-Termination Claims

With apparent increasing frequency, post-termination claims are being filed against employers who are otherwise doing an excellent job providing a safe work environment and comprehensive safety training. What can you do? >> Strategies for limiting these claims

OSHA-Approved State Plans

Twenty-seven states have OSHA-approved state plans. If yours is one of those, you may be noncompliant and not even realize it. Four states--California, Michigan, Oregon, and Washington--have standards that frequently differ from federal standards.

Take a look to see if your state is on the list.


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