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DuraLabel's Weekly Safety News

Blog Author Angelique Sanders

Weekly safety news. Stay in touch with regulations from OSHA, NFPA, and other safety codes. Find out about other companies' best and worst practices. We scour the internet to provide you with helpful training resources and the latest safety information.


Monday, January 23, 2012

Summary Of Last Week's Major OSHA Citations

 OSHA major citations announced during the week of January 15th.






American Marazzi Tile Cited For 25 Violations ($318,000)
Curt Manufacturing Cited For Lack Of Machine Guarding ($105,000)


American Marazzi Tile was cited for 25 safety and health violations for exposing workers to excessive noise levels, machine guarding hazards and other dangerous conditions at its facility in Sunnyvale. Proposed penalties total $318,000.

OSHA's Dallas Area Office initiated an investigation on July 13 at the company's Clay Road facility as part of the agency's Site-Specific Targeting Program, which directs enforcement resources to workplaces with higher-than-average injury and illness rates.

"This company knowingly failed to implement necessary safety and health programs to protect employees from coming into contact with moving parts of machinery and prevent hearing loss," said John Hermanson, OSHA's regional administrator in Dallas. "It's the employer's responsibility to know the hazards and safeguard workers from these hazards in order to provide a working environment free of injuries and illnesses."

Three willful violations involve failing to establish and maintain a hearing conservation program for workers exposed to noise levels exceeding 85 decibels; provide the required machine guards for exposed belts, pulleys, chains and sprockets; and establish a lockout/tagout program for energy sources to protect workers from the unexpected start up of machinery. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to employee safety and health.

Twenty-one serious violations involve failing to provide personal protective equipment, provide confined space training, provide machine guarding to prevent workers from coming into contact with rotating parts, develop energy control procedures for machines with more than one energy source, provide fire extinguisher training, properly store oxygen and acetylene cylinders, develop a bloodborne pathogens program and train employees on hazardous chemicals used in the facility. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

One other-than-serious violation is for failing to post a copy of the hearing conservation standard in the workplace. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

OSHA has placed American Marazzi Tile in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law. Initiated in June 2010, the program focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations.


OSHA has cited Curt Manufacturing LLC with eight safety violations, including one willful violation for allowing workers to continue operating an unguarded hydraulic power press brake after a worker was injured. On July 25, the employee's thumb was crushed while he was bending a metal part between the unguarded dies of the brake. The thumb had to be medically amputated. The Eau Claire-based company was still operating the unguarded press brake when OSHA initiated an inspection on Aug. 16 based on a referral from the state of Wisconsin. Proposed fines total $105,000.

"Failing to have proper machine guarding in the first place, and to cease operating the power press brake in order to correct safety discrepancies following the injury of a worker, demonstrate a complete lack of regard for employees' safety and health," said Mark Hysell, OSHA's area director in Eau Claire. "OSHA is committed to protecting workers on the job, especially when employers fail to do so."

The willful violation carries a proposed penalty of $70,000. A willful violation is one committed with intentional, knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or plain indifference to employee safety and health.

Five serious safety violations with proposed penalties of $35,000 involve failing to develop, document and use hazardous energy control procedures for machines with multiple energy sources; conduct annual inspections of those procedures; ensure lockout devices were affixed to energy isolating devices by authorized employees; provide point-of-operation guarding on a band saw and tube bender; and provide hand tools that permit easy material handling and prevent workers from placing their hands in machine danger zones. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Two other-than-serious violations involve failing to provide information to workers voluntarily using respirators and failing to evaluate a potential permit-required confined space. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical injury.

The citations may be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/CurtManufacturingLLC_97672_01-13-12.pdf*.

Curt Manufacturing specializes in the manufacture of towing components and employs approximately 430 people.

Related Past Posts:
OSHA Citations - Week Of January 8th

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posted by Steve Hudgik
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2 Comments:

Anonymous Anonymous said...

OSHA is finally issuing significant fines and it is making a difference. Companys are seeing it cost less to protect workers safety than to make more profit.

6:51 AM  
Blogger SteelFabCorp said...

OSHA fines are not what makes for good safety. Fines can be paid and just be a cost of doing business. Putting a focus on avoiding fines means we are going to eventually miss something and people will get hurt. We need to care about the safety of our employees and contractors. If our employees are not important to us, no amount of government coercion will work. The rules will just get more and more onerous and still won't cover all possibilities.

7:06 AM  

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