888.326.9244

DuraLabel's Weekly Safety News

Blog Author Angelique Sanders

Weekly safety news. Stay in touch with regulations from OSHA, NFPA, and other safety codes. Find out about other companies' best and worst practices. We scour the internet to provide you with helpful training resources and the latest safety information.


Monday, March 12, 2012

Summary Of Major OSHA Citations - Week Of March 4th



Summary of major OSHA citations announced during the week of March 4th.

The following are based on press releases from OSHA.


Baytown, Texas-based JSW Steel Cited For Safety And Health Hazards ($469,400)
OSHA Cites Hobart Brothers For 55 Safety Violations ($174,000)
OSHA cites Falls Stamping and Welding in Cleveland ($124,700)

OSHA has cited JSW Steel (USA) Inc. with 11 repeat, 23 serious and two other-than-serious violations for exposing employees to safety and health hazards at the company's facility on East McKinney Road in Baytown. Proposed penalties total $469,420.

"This company has operated in a way that disregards the safety and health of its employees," said John Hermanson, OSHA's regional administrator in Dallas. "OSHA will not tolerate employers that do not protect their workers."

OSHA's Houston South Area Office initiated a safety inspection on Sept. 7, 2011, as a result of several employee complaints, while concurrently conducting a site-specific target inspection. OSHA's Site-Specific Targeting Program focuses on establishments with high rates of injuries and illnesses. Both inspections were performed as follow-up to an inspection in November 2008.

The repeat violations include failing to provide covers for open pits and floor holes, develop and conduct periodic inspections for lockout/tagout procedures for energy sources, ensure that fire extinguishers were mounted and readily available, remove damaged rigging and lifting devices from service, provide the required machine guarding for rotating parts and ensure that hazardous chemical containers were properly labeled to identify their contents. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. OSHA cited the company in May 2009 for similar violations with penalties totaling $146,500.

The serious violations include failing to cover floor openings, guard open-sided platforms and provide railings along walkways above dangerous equipment, ensure that stairways providing access for emergency exits were of adequate width, adequately secure compressed gas cylinders, ensure the use of personal protective equipment such as goggles and gloves, and ensure that lockout/tagout procedures were followed for cranes. Additionally, numerous electrical hazards were found, including failing to repair conductors and provide covers for junction boxes. A serious violation is one in which there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

The other-than-serious violations are failing to follow OSHA's standard to evaluate the workplace for respiratory hazards and to provide training on the use of filtering face pieces. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

OSHA has placed JSW Steel in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law. The program focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations. For more information on the program, visit http://s.dol.gov/J3.

The citations can be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/JSWSteelCitations315722769030612.pdf*
http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/JSWSteelCitations315723452030612.pdf*.


OSHA has cited Hobart Brothers Co., a manufacturer of welding wire and ground power equipment for airplanes in Troy, with a total of 55 safety and health violations including inadequate lockout/tagout programs, fall protection and noise sampling, among others. Proposed penalties total $174,600.

Read an article about these citations in the Dayton Daily News.

OSHA opened an inspection under the agency's Site-Specific Targeting program, which focuses on companies with injury and illness rates that exceed national standards. Hobart Brothers' injury and illness rate in 2008 was 5.9 percent per 100 workers, and in 2009 it was 6 percent per 100. The 2008 national average was 3.9, and the 2009 average was 3.6.

Thirty-one serious safety violations with penalties of $121,500 involve failing to guard floor holes, provide adequate railings, unlock exit doors, isolate energy sources, guard machines, provide fall protection for workers required to be on the top of ovens, provide lockout/tagout procedures for the energy sources of equipment, train workers on hazardous energy sources, use and install equipment in accordance with the manufacturer's recommendations, and provide appropriate personal protective equipment for employees performing energized electrical work.

Twelve serious health violations with penalties of $51,300 involve failing to sample noise levels, provide annual audiograms, train workers on hazard communication and provide confined space evaluations. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Seven other-than-serious safety violations with no monetary penalties involve failing to store combustible rags in a covered metal receptacle, properly mark exit doors and train workers on fire hazards. Five other-than-serious health violations with proposed penalties of $1,800 were cited for failing to properly record injuries and illnesses as well as post noise standards. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

"Failing to develop and implement procedures to control hazardous energy and to provide fall protection exposes workers to amputations, falls and many other hazards while demonstrating this employer's lack of regard for workers' safety and health," said Bill Wilkerson, OSHA's area director in Cincinnati. "OSHA is committed to protecting workers on the job, especially when employers fail to do so."

The citations can be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Hobart_Safety_98332_0302012.pdf* http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Hobart_Health_98373_0302012.pdf*.


OSHA has cited Falls Stamping and Welding Co. with a total of 19 — including one willful and three repeat — safety and health violations. OSHA began an inspection after receiving a complaint alleging a failure to lock out and tag out machinery energy sources at the company's Cleveland metal stamping facility, which exposed workers to amputation hazards. Proposed penalties total $124,740.

The willful violation has been cited for failing to ensure workers who lock out machinery, such as mechanical power presses, were trained in lockout and tagout procedures. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.

The repeat violations include failing to provide machine guarding for equipment including lathes and shears, ensure that hand controls on mechanical power presses were in a fixed position to prevent workers from relocating them and ensure that safety blocks were used when changing the press die. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Similar violations were cited at the company's Cuyahoga Falls facility in 2009.

Seven serious safety violations involve failing to develop and document machine-specific lockout/tagout procedures, provide a periodic review of energy control procedures for the mechanical power presses, ensure that guards were in place on the maintenance department grinder, provide safety blocks for workers making adjustments and repairs to a mechanical power press, and ensure that the horizontal band saw's power cable had effective strain relief.

Four serious health violations include failing to perform a required workplace hazard assessment, train workers in the use of portable fire extinguishers, implement a hazard communication training program and evaluate powered industrial truck operators for competency. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Four other-than-serious health violations involve failing to label bottles of oil with their contents and hazard warnings, affix a plate to indicate the load rating for the mezzanine storage level and include a list of hazardous chemicals used in the company's hazard communication program. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

"Failing to train workers in proper lockout and tagout procedures of energy sources in a manufacturing environment places workers at risk of amputations and other serious injuries," said Howard Eberts, OSHA's area director in Cleveland. "Employers cited with repeat violations demonstrate a lack of attention to employee safety and health. OSHA is committed to protecting workers on the job, especially when employers fail to do so."

Due to the willful and repeat violations and the nature of the hazards, OSHA has placed Falls Stamping and Welding Co. in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates targeted follow-up inspections to ensure compliance with the law. The program focuses on recalcitrant employers that endanger workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations. For more information about the program, visit http://s.dol.gov/J3.

Prior to this inspection, the first of the company's Cleveland location, Falls Stamping and Welding Co.'s Cuyahoga Falls facility had been inspected by OSHA 19 times.

The citations can be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/FallsStampingWelding_106894_0224_12.pdf*.



Related Past Posts:
Summary of OSHA Citations For Week Of February 26th
Summary Of OSHA Citations For Week Of February 19th
Summary Of OSHA Citations For Week Of February 12th

Labels: , , , , , ,

posted by Steve Hudgik
View This Post - (1 Comments)
|



1 Comments:

Anonymous Electrician in Houston said...

Hello – I have to say, M impressed with your blog. Its seems very nice and information was very easy to access. I found what I wanted in no time at all. Attractive and amazing. Would appreciate it if you add forums or something, it would be a perfect way for your clients to interact. Great job

11:28 PM  

Post a Comment

Subscribe to Post Comments [Atom]

Links to this post:

Create a Link

<< Home