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DuraLabel's Weekly Safety News

Blog Author Angelique Sanders

Weekly safety news. Stay in touch with regulations from OSHA, NFPA, and other safety codes. Find out about other companies' best and worst practices. We scour the internet to provide you with helpful training resources and the latest safety information.


Monday, April 02, 2012

Summary Of Major OSHA Citations - Week Of March 26th



Summary of major OSHA citations announced during the week of March 26th.

The following are based on press releases from OSHA.


OSHA Cites GTO Contractors For Six Safety Violations ($121,660)
OSHA Cites KD Acquisition For 11 Safety Violations ($187,000)
Bridgford Foods Cited For Violations At Chicago Meat Processing Plant ($118,000)


OSHA has cited Neenah-based GTO Contractors LLC with six safety – willful, repeat and serious – violations for failing to protect workers from falls. OSHA began an inspection in September under a local emphasis program on fall protection after inspectors witnessed workers exposed to fall hazards at commercial roofing work sites in Janesville and Middleton. Proposed penalties total $121,660.

"Falls are the leading cause of death in the construction industry. Failing to provide fall protection places workers at risk for serious injuries," said Kim Stille, OSHA's area director in Madison. "Employers cited with repeat violations demonstrate a lack of attention to employee safety and health. OSHA is committed to protecting workers on the job, especially when employers fail to do so."

A willful violation – failing to provide fall protection on a steep-pitch roof – was cited at both locations. A willful violation is one committed with intentional knowing or voluntary disregard for the law's requirements, or with plain indifference to worker safety and health.

Two repeat violations involve not providing workers with fall protection training at either site. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Similar violations were cited in 2007 at a work site in McFarland.

Finally, a safety and health program for workers was not implemented at either site, resulting in two serious violations. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

Detailed information on scaffold hazards and safe work practices, including an interactive eTool, is available online at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/fallprotection/index.html.

Prior to these inspections, GTO Contractors had been inspected by OSHA five times since 2007, resulting in citations for five violations related to fall protection standards.

The most recent citations can be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/GTOContractors_107379_0322_12.pdf* and http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/_109197_0322GTOContractors_12.pdf*.The company has 15 business days from receipt of those citations and accompanying penalties to comply, request an informal conference with OSHA's area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


OSHA has cited poultry processor KD Acquisition I LLC, doing business as Coleman Natural Foods, with 11 safety violations. OSHA's Atlanta-East Area Office opened an inspection at the KD4 processing plant on Candler Road in Gainesville after receiving a complaint in September about safety hazards. Proposed penalties total $187,100.

Two repeat violations, each carrying a $70,000 fine, include allowing untrained workers to assist with and perform conveyor belt adjustments, and operating the conveyor belt system without machine guards that would protect workers from rotating parts, flying chips and sparks. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Similar violations were cited at the company's KD5 plant in Braselton in 2007.

Eight serious violations, with penalties of $47,100, involve failing to provide adequate safety protection to workers exposed to anhydrous ammonia, train workers handling hazardous materials, provide written lockout/tagout procedures to shut down the energy sources of equipment, conduct an annual inspection of procedures to verify accuracy and perform complete lockout/tagout procedures when servicing or maintaining equipment. Workers also were exposed to a number of electrical hazards due to damaged wiring on a roof top hoist, an electrical panel cabinet that required employees to work near energized parts when resetting electrical relays, and electrical receptacles located in wet and damp locations.. Finally, workers were exposed to fall hazards from stairs located close to an unprotected roof edge. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

An other-than-serious violation with no monetary penalty has been cited for not posting signs on air handling units to indicate that they were permit-required confined spaces. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

In January, OSHA again cited the Braselton plant, for eight violations with $142,150 in proposed fines.

"KD Acquisitions has a history of endangering its workers by exposing them to serious safety and health hazards that must be corrected before a worker is seriously injured," said William Fulcher, director of OSHA's Atlanta-East office.

The current citations can be viewed at http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/KDAcquisitionsI_315738872_0314_12.pdf*.

KD Acquisition has 15 business days from receipt of the citations and proposed penalties to comply, request a conference with OSHA's area director or contest the findings before the independent Occupational Safety and Health Review Commission.


OSHA has cited Anaheim, Calif.-based Bridgford Foods Corp. with 22 safety and health – including four repeat – violations at its Chicago meat processing plant. Proposed penalties total $118,700.

OSHA's Calumet City Area Office began an inspection Sept. 29 at the Chicago plant as part of the agency's Severe Violator Enforcement Program, which mandates follow-up inspections of recalcitrant employers that have endangered workers by committing willful, repeat or failure-to-abate violations. Bridgford Foods was placed in the program after being cited for willful and repeat safety violations based on a July 2010 inspection at the Chicago plant for exposing workers to energized equipment by failing to implement and provide training on lockout/tagout procedures.

Three repeat health violations involve failing to mark chemical containers with their contents and hazardous warning labels, as well as to provide an emergency eyewash station for employees working with corrosive chemicals such as sodium hypochlorite and anhydrous ammonia. One repeat safety violation is having an obstructed emergency exit. A repeat violation exists when an employer previously has been cited for the same or a similar violation of a standard, regulation, rule or order at any other facility in federal enforcement states within the last five years. Similar safety violations were cited in 2010 and similar health violations were cited in 2008 and 2010 at the Chicago facility.

Nine serious safety violations involve a lack of guardrails on open pits, no hoist way enclosure on an elevator shaft, a lack of machine guarding, no handrails on staircases with six risers and a lack of emergency illumination, as well as electrical safety violations such as not enclosing live electrical equipment, missing electrical ground pins, not inspecting the power cords of damaged equipment and not covering unused circuit breakers.

Seven serious health violations include failing to conduct annual respirator fit tests and training, provide an emergency response plan and first responder awareness training, provide annual hazardous material technical-level training, conduct hazard assessments for employees exposed to eye and skin hazards, and use electrical equipment approved for a hazardous location. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

One other-than serious safety violation is failing to have floor hole covers and one other-than-serious health violation is failing to have material safety data sheets for the chemical sodium hypochlorite. An other-than-serious violation is one that has a direct relationship to job safety and health, but probably would not cause death or serious physical harm.

"Bridgford Foods Processing has the responsibility to ensure that its employees are properly trained and protected from workplace hazards such as falls and chemical use," said Gary Anderson, OSHA's area director in Calumet City. "Employers cited for repeat violations demonstrate a lack of commitment to employee safety and health. OSHA is committed to protecting workers, especially when employers fail to do so."

This OSHA inspection was the fifth since 2007 of the Chicago facility, where about 150 workers are employed. Bridgford Foods Processing, which employs about 535 workers companywide, operates two facilities in Dallas, Texas, and one in Statesville, N.C.

OSHA also has conducted follow-up inspections at the Dallas facilities under the Severe Violator Enforcement Program. Eight safety violations carrying $174,500 in penalties were cited in February 2012 at the facility on Chancellor Row, and 27 safety and health violations carrying $422,600 were cited in October 2011 at the facility on South Good Latimer Expressway. For more information about the program, visit http://s.dol.gov/J3.

The citations can be viewed at: http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Bridgford-Food-Processing-Corp_107124_0328_12.pdf* and http://www.osha.gov/ooc/citations/Bridgford-Food-Processing-Corp_107107_0328_12.pdf*.


OSHA


Related Past Posts:
Summary of OSHA Citations For Week Of March 19th
Summary Of OSHA Citations For Week Of March 12th
$422,600 In Proposed OSHA Fines For Noise and Energized Equipment Hazards

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